St. James' - Salluit, Nunavik
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The northern Inuit village of Salluit is located on the Hudson Strait, on the east bank of the Saglouc Fjord, 120 kilometers east of Ivujivik and 600 kilometers northwest of Kuujjuaq. Principle access to Salluit is by air. There are about 1030 people in Salluit and the principle languages spoken in the community are Inuktitut and English. "Saglouc" and "Sugluk", names by which the community has been known in the past, are variations of Salluit, the Inuit word for "skinny people". The name was officially adopted when the village was incorporated in 1979.

The Purtuniq mine, 50 kilometers from Salluit, at Deception Bay, is a significant player in the local economy. Seal, beluga whale and walrus hunting are traditional activities that remain important in the community.

The Anglican mission was first established in 1955 and a church was constructed in 1957. A new church was built in 2006. The parish has 2 outstations one is Ivujivik and the other is Kangiqsujuaq.

This parish is currently vacant.

Ivujivik - St. Columba's
The northern village of Ivujivik is located on the Hudson Strait, 800 kilometers north of Kuujjuarapik and 700 kilometers northwest of Kuujjuaq. Principle access to Ivujivik is by air. There are about 280 people in Ivujivik and the principle languages are Inuktitut and English. The name "Ivujivik" means "the place where the ice floes block".

Seal, beluga whale and walrus hunting and soapstone sculpting are traditional activities in the community.

The Anglican mission was established in approximately 1965. A new church was built in 2000.

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In September 2003, Peter Ainalik was ordained a deacon and in 2005 he was priested. Peteris now retired and residing in Ivujivik.

Kangiqsujuaq - Church of the Epiphany
Kangiqsujuaq is located on the south bank of Wakem Bay, opposite the Hudson Strait, 420 kilometers northwest of Kuujjuaq. Principle access to the community is by air. There is a population of approximately 470 and the principle languages spoken are Inuktitut and English. The name "Kangiqsujuaq" means "the large bay". The name was officially adopted in 1980.

Fishing for arctic char, hunting caribou, sea-mammals and wildfowl are the principal economic activities in Kangiqsujuaq.

The Anglican Church was built in 1965 and the Anglican mission station was permanently established in 1966.